Beat the COVID-19 Blues With These Wildlife and Nature Livecams

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With the coronavirus continuing to spread and self-isolation becoming the norm, it feels more important than ever to embrace the power and beauty of nature. Sure, we can’t travel as much these days, but the modern world can still bring the natural world to us.

We’ve picked some great webcams around the globe to help keep you sane in these trying times. Depending on the time of day or night you’re reading this, they should offer you some solace and wonder for the long weeks ahead.

Tembe Elephant Park

One of several great livecams from Explore.org. This one brings you to a very popular watering hole on the Mozambique border.

Decorah Eagles

A rare opportunity to see bald eagles up close and relaxed in Decorah, Iowa.

 

Gorilla Forest Corridor

You may or may not see any critically endangered Grauer’s gorillas, but this is a heck of a peaceful site in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Coral City

An urban reef in Miami, Florida that’s part habitat, part science experiment and part art project. You never know who might swim by.

 

Cornell Lab’s Panama Fruit Feeder-cam at Canopy Lodge

Pay attention. All kinds of colorful birds fly by to sample the wares that scientists have left out for them at this conservation site in Panama.

 

Big Sur Condors

Two webcams from the Ventana Wildlife Society showcasing the amazing California condors in their care. The birds aren’t always on camera, but it’s worth sticking around to see them.

Big Sur Condor Nest powered by EXPLORE.org

 

Bison Watering Hole at Grasslands National Park

Again, you never know what wildlife you’ll witness onscreen, but the beauty of this site in Saskatchewan can take your breath away.

There’s more! We found one more essential livestream that we can’t embed but it’s worth opening a new browser tab to see:

Red Wolf enclosure cam — Check out one of the rarest predators on the planet, courtesy of the conservation breeding program at the Wolf Conservation Center, which also maintains several other great webcams.

Don’t find something you like above? You can also try going for a walk to see what wildlife or natural beauties you can find in your neighborhood. After all, self-isolation doesn’t mean we have to keep ourselves indoors all day and all night.

While you’re at it, bring your phone and share photos of what you see on iNaturalist or other citizen-science platforms — that’s one more way to stay connected with your community and avoid feelings of isolation. And you can help collect important scientific information along the way.

No matter what you do, please just stay safe. The world will still need you when all of this is over.

Article Source: EcoWatch