What on Earth is REDD+?

Cloud forest in Chyulu Hills, Kenya. (© Charlie Shoemaker) Editor’s note: From “climate adaptation” to “blue carbon,” from “landscape approach” to “ecosystem services,” environmental jargon is everywhere these days. Conservation International’s Human Nature blog looks to make sense of it in an occasional explainer series we’re calling “What on Earth?”  In this installment, we break down […]

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Largest T. rex skeleton ever found lived in Canada up to its early 30s

Researchers at the University of Alberta (UAlberta) have reported finding the world’s largest Tyrannosaurus rex and the largest dinosaur ever discovered in Canada — they named it “Scotty”. A T. rex skull (not Scotty’s). Image credits Jill White. The impressive skeleton spans 13 meters in length and, in true paleontologist fashion, was nicknamed for a […]

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Snake venom can vary in a single species — and it’s not just about adaptation to their prey

The Mohave rattlesnake — poster child for venom variation among rattlesnakes. W. Wüster, Author provided (No reuse) Few sights and sounds are as emblematic of the North American southwest as a defensive rattlesnake, reared up, buzzing, and ready to strike. The message is loud and clear, “Back off! If you don’t hurt me, I won’t […]

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Protecting Africa’s oceans to secure our futures

Coast of Liberia. (© Trond Larsen) Editor’s note: This week, Conservation International is co-hosting the Blue Oceans Conference in Liberia to bring attention to ocean conservation issues in Africa, where they have been historically undervalued. Jessica Donovan-Allen, country director of Conservation International Liberia, spoke at the conference. Here is an edited version of her prepared […]

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